Today, I have a client celebrating a major life victory – he sold his business that he’d built over 25 years.  It’s a big deal.  It was an arduous journey.  It tested his mettle. And there’s more to the story than the victorious ending.

This was his second run at a sale.  He had a buyer last year and as we worked through the sale process, it became clear the buyer wasn’t the right fit. He tried to force it and make it work and compromise on the items that were truly important to him.  He was afraid if this one slipped away there might not be another one. He spent a lot of money on the sales process and he desperately wanted the victory.  However, desperation will never drive a successful outcome and most often leads to regret.

We had a serious heart to heart and I reminded him of his criteria for the sale, his big “Why” driving the sale and what he desired from an ideal sale transaction.  When he honestly reviewed the transaction against his goals, he realized it didn’t meet his needs.  He stepped back into his power, walked away from the deal and trusted that the right deal that served his goals would show up.

Fast forward…  

Within months, we had the winning formula:  

the perfect buyer + the perfect deal + the perfect terms = champagne toast

Morale of the Story – Sometimes we have to say a big NO to get to the big YES.

Life will often test us to see how committed we are to our goals, desires and vision.  Have you ever noticed when you get close to the finish line of a meaningful project, you bump up against challenges and obstacles?

This is the time to step back and remind yourself of what is important and why, what you are willing to do to achieve success and what you refuse to do.

There’s a time and place to walk away and there’s a time and place to push through. So, how do you know which it is?

First, when you create a goal or put a big vision into play, clearly define what a win looks like, identify your criteria for a success and define your non-negotiables – what are those things that you absolutely must have and refuse to compromise on?

Second, clearly articulate and keep the vision in front of you, your team and everyone involved in the process so you can hold each other accountable.

Third, honor your values and trust yourself.  An element of trust is integrity, which Brene Brown summarizes as “choose what’s right, not what’s fun, fast and easy.”

Fourth, make decisions from a position of power.  We can’t make good decisions from fear, desperation, anger or other heated emotions. They cloud our judgment and distort reality.  Find your center, apply the above criteria, make your decision and stand in it.

Fifth, believe in the magic working in the background that I talked about last week. Trust that your dreams are valuable, you are worthy of achieving them and they will blossom to fruition.

What vision are you putting into play? And how will you celebrate your victory?